Medical hand is a health management service

COVID-19

Current status

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has announced that COVID-19 is a pandemic.

Currently, Australia does not have widespread community transmission of COVID-19. Find out how we are managing the outbreak to slow the spread.

In Australia

As at 6.30am on 20 March 2020, there have been 709 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Australia. There have been 144 new cases since 6.30am yesterday.

Location Confirmed cases*
Australian Capital Territory 4
New South Wales 307
Northern Territory 0
Queensland 144
South Australia 42
Tasmania 10
Victoria 150
Western Australia 52
Total** 709
  • *Note that under National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System reporting requirements, cases are reported based on their Australian jurisdiction of residence rather than where they were detected. For example, a case reported previously in the NT in a NSW resident is counted in the national figures as a NSW case.
  • **Includes Diamond Princess repatriation cases: Qld (3), SA (1), Vic (4), WA (2, including 1 death)

Of the 709 confirmed cases in Australia, 6 have died from COVID-19. Jurisdictions have tested over 100,000 people.

Reference : https://www.health.gov.au/news/health-alerts/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-health-alert/coronavirus-covid-19-current-situation-and-case-numbers#current-status

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Health Alert

Background :

On 30 January 2020, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus (COVID – 19) outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern prompting the Australian Government to issue a health alert as a precaution. You can access the latest updates on

https://www.health.gov.au/news/health-alerts/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-health-alert

The first case in Australia was confirmed in Victoria on 25 January 2020. As at 2 March 2020, we have 29 confirmed cases of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Australia.

Australian Government agencies and state and territory governments are working together to coordinate an evidence-based response. This includes:

–        providing information based on the latest medical advice

–        applying a 14-day isolation period to people at risk of getting coronavirus

–        applying travel restrictions to reduce the number of travellers from seriously affected countries

–        tracing coronavirus cases

–        continuing to screen travellers who arrive in Australia

–        continuing with border surveillance

–        applying enhanced border measures at international air and sea ports

State and territory health authorities are:

–        testing anyone who shows symptoms of the virus

–        monitoring close contacts of confirmed cases every day

Who is at Risk :

In Australia, the people most at risk of getting the virus are those who have:

  • recently been in mainland China / Iran
  • been in close contact with someone who is a confirmed case of coronavirus

What are we doing ?

We will continue to monitor health guidelines and restrictions (including countries from where returning residents will be required to self-quarantine)  by the Australian Government as well as the advice given by the General Conference Health Department. We will update advice as appropriate and work to keep our community safe. There is currently no intention to cancel or postpone any of the programmes involving AUC staff in Australia. Should the situation change, then participants will be notified. The intention is to keep mission, leadership and training active within what is safe, and within government guidelines.

Current advice by the Department of Health and Human Service to the Victorian Public :

If you have been in mainland China (excluding Hong Kong SAR, Macau and Taiwan) or Iran in the past 14 days you are advised to:

  • stay at home (self-quarantine)
  • avoid public settings – this means you should not attend work, school, childcare or university or go to other public places such as restaurants, cinemas or shopping centres and should not use public transport or taxis
  • do this for 14 days after leaving mainland China (other than when seeking medical care).

If you have been in close contact with someone who has coronavirus disease (COVID-19):

  • stay at home (self-quarantine)
  • avoid public settings for 14 days after you last came into contact with them.

If you fall into the risk groups above and begin to feel unwell and develop a fever or shortness of breath, a cough or respiratory illness during your period of isolation (self-quarantine), you should seek immediate medical attention.

Call ahead to your GP or emergency department and mention your travel history before you arrive.

If you are concerned call the Department of Health and Human Service’s coronavirus hotline on 1800 675 398.

Please keep Triple Zero (000) for emergencies only.

What else can you do? 

  • You should pay close attention to good hand hygiene. Wash your hands regularly with soap and water, especially before eating and after using the toilet.
  • Refrain from touching your face.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing with a tissue
  • Cough into your elbow.
  • Dispose of tissues into a bin and then wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Use a hand sanitiser if available.